Wellness

Talking with someone for the first time can go in a few directions—conversation can feel stilted and forced, or words can flow with ease and topics take pleasant turns like a gentle breeze. An interview with therapist Tammie Rosenbloom yielded the latter.

Walk in to Läka Spa and take a deep breath. The subtle fragrance of seven essential oils—including lavender, lemon and sage—instantly soothes and relaxes.

The weather outside is frightful, and because this is January in Minnesota, it’s probably going to stay that way for a while. Cabin fever is all too real, and if you’ve got kids at home, you’re likely feeling its effects doubly (or triply).

Minnetonka resident Betsy Sansby is a licensed marriage and family therapist. Last year, she received the OpenCare Patients’ Choice award for therapists in the Minnetonka area.

The van must have carried a thick scent of trepidation and uncertainty, mixed with the smell of fried octopus, which a trio of interpreters, seated in the van’s rear seats, popped into their mouths like buttery popcorn.

After five years of navigating an often-complicated process to find the best living options for her aging parents and her in-laws, licensed social worker Shelley Anderson decided to live out the adage, “If you want something done right, do it yourself.” In February, Anderson founded

“When I’m there, I feel happy—energetic,” says Barb*, who participates in Artful Aging™ poetry workshops led by Zoë Bird. “She opens my mind to the topic of the day,” Barb says of Bird. “She knows how to bring you out. I love her energy.”

The average couple has trouble in their relationship for six years before seeking help, says Jen Elmquist, a licensed marriage and family therapist in Excelsior.

When Heidi Whitaker lost a tooth when she was a girl, her mother would give her a little pillow to tuck it into so the Tooth Fairy could find it and leave behind a reward.

Love is a tricky, sometimes sticky, situation to be in. When it first begins, it’s beautiful and refreshing. After some time, it becomes comfortable and reliable. But most don’t expect it to end. When it does, we become our own support systems.

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