Arts

reading Caste, by Isabel Wilkerson

Do you have a favorite quote from a book? Are there words that you can read over and over and still find fresh layers of meaning? Recently, I found myself drawn back to words written by E. B. White (Charlotte’s Web and Stuart Little).

This spring, more than 20 local artists shared their work with visitors at eight different homes and studios that were open for the tour.

As a couple, Jen Westmoreland Bouchard and Michael Bouchard seem to be a study in contrasts. They prioritize international travel yet live in a house that’s been in Jen’s family since 1958.

Thomas Strand has always had an instinctive passion for photography. As a child he remembers the enjoyment of taking photos during family vacations. “I just always knew I wanted to do it,” says Strand.

It could be argued that Marina Castillo only creates self-portraits. As a photographer and mixed-media artist, her work is deeply reflective of her culture, her faith and her passion, which manifests itself physically. “I start to sweat,” Castillo says.

Walking through an old building in Lowertown can reveal a lot about the lives shaped within its walls.

When Amudalat talks about her dream to attend Harvard University, her energy is palpable and her enthusiasm enviable. The incoming junior at Saint Paul Conservatory for Performing Artists didn’t always speak with such passion. “I lost my voice a bit in sixth grade,” she says.

High Low Glitter, the game that Stephanie Ross created to encourage her twin daughters, Heather and Emily, to reflect on and share their daily experiences, has evolved into a free app that allows family members to stay connected to each

Ostrom Creative’s tongue-in-cheek tagline boasts that they are “quite possibly the best small ad agency in all of Excelsior, Minnesota.” This cheeky slogan gives us a pretty good picture of the shop’s personality: witty, humorous, confid

Nine Nights of Music, a free outdoor concert series that highlights Saint Paul’s vibrant music community, returns this summer for its 19th season.

For more than 25 years, the Minnetonka Center for the Arts has supplemented its year-round programming with its summer arts camps for young art lovers ages 5 through 15.

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