People

Tiffany Kokal spends hours behind a camera, but photography hasn’t always been her full-time job. She has always had a deep love of art but was working as a dental assistant when the photography bug bit.

Every year, the Excelsior-Lake Minnetonka Chamber of Commerce awards one member of the chamber community who goes above and beyond the typical duties of their work.

What’s kendama, you ask? It’s a Japanese skill game using a wooden toy, similar to the cup and ball toy familiar to most Americans. The ken has three cups and a spike. Attached to the ken by a string is a ball with a hole in the middle.

“My biggest concern was not that I might die of this disease, but how was I going to live with it for as long as I could have?” Minnetonka’s Teri Woodhull says in the opening of a video for the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

As a columnist, social media connector and former radio co-host with Twila Dang on myTalk 107.1, Excelsior resident Natalie Webster thrives in the communications sphere.

Hovering above two desks on opposite sides of a wall are two faux neon pictures—one of the letter X, the other a Z.

This is no coincidence. David Stillman, the 49-year-old Generation Xer, sits at the desk under the X. His son, Jonah, the 18-year-old Generation Zer, sits under the Z.

The Music Association of Minnetonka welcomes new artistic director Sean Vogt. Incredibly, this is the ensemble’s first directorial change in 40 years.

She drinks an elixir of cider vinegar, honey, warm water and a dash of lemon juice every day—she has for as long as she can remember, possibly since she was a teenager.

When lake-area native and Minnetonka High graduate Maddie Peters decided to pursue a career in medicine, she was continuing a rich family tradition.

According to landscape architect Bruce Lemke, every one of his own nature-based sculptures begins with a story that he creates for himself to get his creative juices flowing.

Pages