Then & Now

Goodyear Blimp celebrates Youngstedts’ 50 years in business

“Wouldn’t trust my family’s vehicles to anyone else,” says a customer of 27 years with Youngstedts, according to a Google review—one out of hundreds that are left by returning and new customers who trust Youngstedts with their vehicles.

The sunset over Lafayette Bay.

Delivery boats were both a reliable and direct way to deliver goods on Lake Minnetonka, as roads did not exist to all parts of the lake or were often washed out.

The Minnehaha, a streetcar steamboat on Lake Minnetonka

The streetcar steamboat Minnehaha is one of the most iconic symbols of Lake Minnetonka’s heritage.

The sunset as seen from Big Island on Lake Minnetonka

Read the lesser known history of one of Lake Minnetonka's most prominent landmarks.

Lakewood Cemetery, where David C. Bell is buried.

David Bell laid the cornerstone for Excelsior Academy and played a key role in several early Minneapolis institutions.

Workers harvest ice from Lake Minnetonka, lifting it onto a horse-drawn wagon.

The ice harvest was an important time on Lake Minnetonka in the early 1900s.

Excelsior's Trinity Episcopal Church chapel circa 1920.

Trinity Episcopal Church has a complicated and dramatic history.

In this historical photo, a group of ice boats sail on Lake Minnetonka.

Ice boating came to Lake Minnetonka in the 1880s, and is still popular to this day.

A car drives on part of Yellowstone Trail, a road that once crossed America.

The motto for the trail was “A Good Road from Plymouth Rock to Puget Sound.”

An advertisement for the Big Boat Burning, when the ship Excelsior was lit on fire on Lake Minnetonka.

In 1901, Dr. George LaPaul had a stern-wheel steamboat built bearing his name at a cost of $10,000.

The George launched from the Excelsior docks with a large crowd of over 1,000 spectators. The boat held 800 passengers and was the largest boat on Lake Minnetonka at the time.

Lake Minnetonka sailing boat the Onawa

Built in 1893 by “Minnetonka’s Boat Builder” Arthur Dyer for Hazen and Ward Burton, the boat was conceived with the idea that greater speed could be attained by sailing over the water, rather than through it.

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