Food & Drink

Take four women, add their respective husbands, mix in a four-course menu, sparkling conversation and expertly-paired wines, and what do you end up with? A fun local dinner club!

Poor eggs. Their reputation has been through the wringer. One week they’re good for you; the next, they’re a no-no. But the “incredible, edible egg” is now back in the nutrition clubhouse, and for good reason: eggs are versatile, affordable and protein-rich.

Bryan Buser’s buddies had their doubts on the advantages of specific pairings of beer with food.

How often do you order dessert when dining out? Not one to share for the table but one just for you? Probably not often enough, considering the bounty of luscious local temptations. The next time you’re out for the evening, don’t just save room for dessert—consider dessert the main event.

Feeling financially wrung out after the season of spending, but still desperate to fend off impending cabin fever? Why not celebrate one of our state’s greatest culinary contributions? No, not hot dish.

A sure-fire way to thwart the winter doldrums is to get busy in the kitchen. Yes, baking cookies is nice, but why not step outside the norm and make some sushi? It’s creatively engaging, perfect for crowds and easier than you’d think.

The rituals of a steak dinner are as exhilarating as they are gratifying: the portentous “clunk” of the serrated knife, the inimitable shape of the martini glass, the crunch of the iceberg wedge, the ginormous baked potato. And as with every beloved tradition, there is quibbling.

Making cookies is a long-standing tradition in many households come holiday time. Whether you do it with your family or a group of friends, the outcome is the same: lots of merriment and plenty of memories to be made.

Between shopping for gifts, tiding the house and worrying about in-law drama, it’s safe to say the holidays are hectic. Colette Flynn of Catered by Colette wants to remove some stress with three easy appetizers you can prepare before your guests arrive for the party.

One person’s comfort food is another person’s heartburn: Comfort food is emphatically not health food, yet there’s no denying the comforting power of food. As we lament the darker, shorter days, it’s important to remember that there is still pleasure to be had.

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